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Proposals put forward to ease fears of dangerous dogs

Experts haved stopped short of recommending a ban on dangerous dogs Keystone

A group of experts which met last month to draft legislation on dangerous dogs has put forward proposals aimed at counteracting the dangers, but has stopped short of recommending a ban on certain breeds.

This content was published on September 18, 2000 - 12:40

The group of veterinary scientists, animal rights experts and politicians said in their report, published on Monday, that a ban on certain breeds would not yield any results.

Nonetheless, they said the government does have a constitutional right to take such action.

The experts have called on the government to set up a central register as a first step to dealing with dangerous dogs, and to establish an advisory body to deal with such cases.

Among their other proposals to parliament are measures to ensure that laws are enforced, greater training for both dogs and their owners, and an information campaign.

It is not clear whether the measures will satisfy members of the public who have become increasingly worried at the growing numbers of aggressive dogs on the streets, following recent vicious attacks in France and Germany.

The issue is to be debated by the House of Representatives during the current session.

Heiner Stüder, a member of parliament from Zurich who is seeking harsher measures, has initiated a parliamentary motion calling for a complete ban in Switzerland of all fighting breeds such as pit bulls, bull terriers and rottweilers

The Swiss Society for the Protection of Animals has been pressing for laws to prevent trained fighting dogs, and those with a history of aggression, from entering the country.

swissinfo with agencies


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