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Geldcast Update: Monetary policy and the climate crisis

Fabio Canetg completed his doctorate in monetary policy at the University of Bern and the Toulouse School of Economics. Today he is a lecturer at the University of Bern and hosts the monetary policy podcast "Geldcast". swissinfo.ch

For years, central banks have been called upon to do more to combat climate change. Now a new monetary policy instrument is being discussed as a way forward.

This content was published on November 3, 2021 - 15:07
Fabio Canetg

The climate strike is back: Last week, thousands of people demonstrated in Bern for a more ambitious climate policy. The Swiss National Bank (SNB) also has a role in this: it should also contribute to the fight against climate change, according to the climate strikers. In Europe, similar demands are being made of the European Central Bank (ECB).

But what exactly could central banks do?

Chiara Colesanti Senni, a researcher at the Council on Economic Policy, has a possible answer: central banks should contribute something to climate change with targeted lending operations. But how would that work exactly? And are the ECB and SNB allowed to make climate policy at all? Find the answers to this and more in the latest Geldcast update (available via youtube).

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From stock exchanges and bitcoin to inflation and monetary policy – the Geldcast update features the latest from the world of international finance. Clear and entertaining for everyone who wants to stay up to date. The podcast is hosted by monetary economist and business journalist Fabio CanetgExternal link.

The SWI swissinfo.ch Geldcast

Author Fabio Canetg completed his doctorate in monetary policy at the University of Bern and the Toulouse School of Economics. Today he is a lecturer at the University of Bern.

As a journalist, he works for SRF Arena, Republik Magazin and SWI swissinfo.ch. He hosts the monetary policy podcast "Geldcast".

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